Friday, 5 July 2013

Training on men's health inequalities for NHS CCGs

The NHS Constitution requires CCGs to promote equality and pay particular attention to sections of society where improvements in health and life expectancy are not keeping pace with the rest of the population. 

As men and boys --- irrespective of age, race, sexuality, disability and social class --- have worse health outcomes and lower life expectancy than their female counterparts, it is essential for CCGs to put a focus on men's health if they are to reduce local health inequalities. 

In order to be rated as "excelling" in their equalities work, CCGs will need to demonstrate that all staff at all levels are continually supported, trained and developed to be competent and confident to plan, procure or deliver services that are personal, fair or diverse to meet the needs of all communities---including men and boys. 

Helping Men offers a range of training, workshops and other services that can help the NHS's new Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGS) to meet the public sector Equality Duty by taking action to improve men and boys' health outcomes, access to services and quality of care.

We offer a range of public workshops that NHS staff can attend which include:
All of these courses can be hosted in house and you can also work with Helping Men to create bespoke training packages and workshop to meet your specific needs. During the quieter month of August we are offering a limited number of special rate in house training specifically targeted at CCGs and other NHS organisations.

If you want to contact Helping Men today about your training needs then email glen@glenpoole.com or call  Glen on 07981 334222.

For further reader see also:

Thursday, 4 July 2013

#10 NHS staff need training on men’s health inequalities



One of the four equality goals that Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) using the Equality Delivery System (EDS) aim for is to promote “empowered, engaged and well supported staff”. In order to be considered as “excelling” in this field, CCGs will need to demonstrate that all staff are always supported, trained and developed to be competent and confident to plan, procure or deliver services that are personal, fair or diverse to meet the needs of all communities---including men and boys. 

The EDS recommends four grades by which CCGs can rate their performance in relation to its work on equalities ---under-developed, developing, achieving and excelling. If a CCG does not have a plan in place to ensure all staff are always supported, trained and developed to meet the needs of men and boys then it will be rated as under-developed in this area. Drafting such a plan puts the CCG in the “developing” grade and putting a plan in place to ensure staff are trained to meet the needs of men and boys raises the grade in this area to “achieving”.

This grading systems applies to all protected groups including men and boys. 

According to the NHS’s guidance on the Equality Delivery System, in taking forward work on equality, CCGs should consider what support, development and training  opportunities should be made available to their staff – at all levels.

The NHS has a commitment to provide all staff with personal development and access to appropriate training for their jobs. As all staff at all levels are expected to be both confident and competent at dealing with men and boys effectively, then specific training on the inequalities that men and boys face may be in order. 

For CCGs committed to tackling the inequalities in men’s health and ensuring that they excel in their equalities work by including men and boys in their equalities thinking, then Helping Men may be able to support you.

Helping Men offers a range of tried and  tested workshops and course to help you work with men and boys more effectively and we are also happy to undertake research and consultancy work and develop bespoke training packages to meet the specific needs of your workforce and communities. 

If you want to contact Helping Men today about your training needs then email glen@glenpoole.com or call Glen on 07981 334222. 


See also:

#9 CCGs can rate how male friendly they are



For Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) who are using the Equality Delivery System (EDS) to rate their equalities work the NHS’s EDS grades manual provides an excellent template for beginning to consider how "male friendly" or "male positive" your organisaton is. 

By reshaping some of the questions about protected groups to focus specifically on men and boys as a distinct group with protected status under the Equality Act 2010, you can begin to build up a picture of how well you are addressing the inequalities experienced by men and boys in your local area.

As men and boys have not traditionally been thought of as a distinct equalities group with specific needs it can be a useful exercise to make time to focus on men and boys. This process can help you to uncover some of the blind spots in your organisation's thinking that you may not currently be aware of.

The following list of questions is based on the NHS’s EDS grades manual and is provided as a starting point to help you begin to consider the inequalities that the men and boys in the communities you serve may be facing:

  • How does the health and well-being of male patients and carers compare with the health and well-being of female patients and carers? 
  • What is the extent of the gap in health inequalities between male patients and carers compared with female patients and carers? 
  • Do you engage with male patients and carers on how their health needs can be met, their well-being promoted and inequalities reduced? 
  • Do you aim to meet the health needs and promote the well-being of men and boys and reduce the health inequalities they experience through mainstream processes? 
  • How do your health-need assessments of male patients and resulting services compare with assessments and resulting services for women? 
  • Do you aim to improve the outcomes of male patients and carers through mainstream processes?  
  • Do public health, vaccination and screening programmes reach and benefit men and boys in the same way that they reach and benefit women and girls? 
  • Do you engage with male patients, carers and staff about how health programmes can be improved and inequalities reduced and do you aim to improve the efficiency of public health programmes for men and boys as part of your mainstream processes? 
  • Do male patients and carers access services at the same rate as female patients and carers; do you engage with men and boys about access to services and how it can be improved and do you aim to improve men and boys’ access to services through mainstream processes? 
  • Do you engage with male patients and carers about how their experience of your orgnaisation can be improved and do you aim to improve the experience of men and boys as part of your mainstream processes? 
  • Do you engage with male patients and carers about how they are informed and supported to be involved with their healthcare and do you aim to improve information and support on the diagnoses and treatments of men and boys as part of your mainstream processes? 
Taking time to ask yourselves these questions can begin to open up your thinking about how you can tackle some of the health inequalities that men and boys experience in terms of health outcomes, access to services and quality of care. 
 

#7 CCGs can lead by example


The NHS is committed to developing a culture of inclusive leadership at all levels. According the NHS’s  guidance on the Equality Delivery System, this means all NHS organisations ensuring that equality is everyone’s business with everyone expected to take an active part. 

For Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) concerned with tackling the health inequalities that men and  boys face, this means taking action to ensure that everyone working in health at a local level is making men’s health their business and is supported by the work of specialist equality leaders and champions. 

“Inclusive leadership at all levels” is one of the four equality goals that CCGs using the Equality Delivery System aim for and in terms of specific outcomes relating to men this means: 
  • Boards and senior leaders conducting and planning their business in ways that advance the equality of men and boys 
  •  Middle managers and other line managers supporting and motivating their staff to work in gender aware ways that ensures the specific needs of men and boys are addressed
  • Using the “Competency Framework for Equality and Diversity Leadership” to recruit, develop and support strategic leaders to advance men’s equality outcomes
The NHS’s “Competency Framework for Equality and Diversity Leadership” outlines the five key areas of performance against which Equality and Diversity leaders are measured. For CCGs this means that their Equality and Diversity leads should be able to reliably and consistently deliver better outcomes for men and boys in a way that:
  • Operates from a human rights context ensuring that the CCG engages and interacts with male patients and service users ---and men and boys in the wider community---in line with the values of Fairness, Respect, Equality, Dignity and Autonomy (FREDA) which underpin the Human Rights Act (1998) 
  • Builds the CCG’s capacity to respond to the changing needs of male patients and service users by developing a rich understanding of and engagement with men and boys in all their diversity 
  • Ensures a robust evidence-based equalities analysis to planning and improving services for men and boys that takes into account national strategies, local service needs and employment practice. 
  • Communicates a compelling business case for taking a human rights approach to advancing the equality of men and boys in all their diversity to influence practice at every level of the CCG and connect with a broad range of strategic partners in the process. 
  • Influences and leads change to improve equality outcomes for male patients and service users by being a change agent who identifies and implements interventions to reduce men’s health inequalities.

#6 Men are under-represented in the NHS



The NHS lacks gender diversity at most levels with women outnumbering men in the NHS workforce by a ratio of three to one. One of the four equality goals that Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) using the Equality Delivery System aim for is “empowered, engaged and well-supported staff”. According to the  NHS’s guidance on the Equality Delivery System, the NHS should be taking action to ensure its paid and non-paid workforce is as diverse as it can be across all occupations and grades. 

It is important to note that men still dominate some of the top positions in the NHS. In 2011, for example, the Health Service Journal revealed that only 15 per cent of chairs and clinical leads of the emerging CCGs were women and addressing the under-representation of women at this level is not incompatible with a focus on the specific needs of men and boys.

However, there is no evidence to suggest that having more men in senior positions within the NHS leads to men’s health inequalities being given more priority. In fact it is only fair to note that many of the leading champions for men’s health around the country are women working within the NHS. 

It is also worth noting that where services are dominated by female staff, as is the case in the NHS generally, then this can be a barrier to men accessing that service. While it may not be possible for CCGs to significantly change the gender diversity of the local workforce, being aware than this could be an issue can help CCGs to take steps to help address this barrier by taking other steps to ensure its services are perceived by men to be male friendly and male inclusive.

Taking simple steps like ensuring publicity is targeted at men, running men-only initiatives, developing specific roles focused on men’s health and appointing men’s health champions can help make a difference. 

Finally, CCGs should be aware that to be considered to be excelling in equalities work, they will need to demonstrate that men and women are represented on the Board, in senior management teams and in clinical leadership roles in the same ratios as they are represented in the total workforce and the population they serve.
In order to be seen as achieving in this area CCGs will need to show they have a plan in place with milestones demonstrating how they will ensure that the proportion of men in senior roles reflects the number of men in the workforce as a whole. CCGs who only focus on increasing the proportion of women in senior roles and ignore the under-representation of men in the total workforce will find it considerably more difficult to be graded as “excelling” in this area.